Challenges

Make it Work Challenge - Part 3

This post will have entries 21-30.

ENTRY #21:  Fit to be Tied        by Sandie Pike

Many years ago, needing to repair an antique crazy quilt, I asked friends for a few old neckties from which I could salvage the silks.  The quilt got its repairs, but the neckties kept coming.  Over the years a couple of hundred found a resting place in a box high on a shelf.  This project has been a great opportunity to put seventy-one of them to use.

The background fabric is an orphan piece of yardage handed to me one night by one of the Guild’s Fanny Basket ladies with the admonition to find a use for it.  I took it home and tossed it up on a shelf.  When I was getting ready to mount the ties on a traditional black or white background, I suddenly remembered that piece of gold fabric on the shelf.  With some “creative” piecing, it became the perfect recycled background for the recycled ties.

Machine quilted and machine appliquéd by participant.

Fit to be Tied

Fit to be Tied

ENTRY #22:  Chinese Mulberry Silk Road         by Jan Finkelstein

The Chinese Mulberry Silk used to make this quilt was imported from China in 1996 by my husband.  He imported silk scarves in various sizes and tried to sell them.  Many I gave as gifts to friends and used myself.  Mulberry silk is the finest silk – the silk worms are fed only Mulberry leaves.  The silk is very desirable and can be machine washed and dried.

Machine pieced by participant; machine quilted by a longarmer

Chinese Mulberry Silk Road

Chinese Mulberry Silk Road

ENTRY #23:  New Life for Old Linens      by Kathy Stubbs Ward

This entry won an Honorable Mention

I have a very large collection of “hurt” linens that have been used to create garments by cutting out the undamaged sections.  However, there are many pieces that are in good shape and just too pretty to cut up.  I decided that some of these pieces could be put together in a small top to display the beautiful designs and workmanship.  A stained bridge tablecloth was used for the back and sleeve.

Machine pieced and machine appliquéd by participant.

New Life for Old Linens

New Life for Old Linens

ENTRY #24:  For Mr. Tiddles            by Thyra Schubert

No materials were purchased to make this quilt.  All fabrics, batting, stencils, and thread were part of my stash.  I wanted to create a quilt using only what I had and include my love of Japanese fabric and cats.  Denim from old Jeans and table linens were also used.  This quilt is “For Mr. Tiddles,” my lovable cat who makes me smile and knows when I need a kiss and a cuddle.

My wonderful husband was particularly pleased that I did not purchase anything for this challenge!

Hand quilted and hand appliquéd by participant. Other techniques include Sachiko and Boro

For Mr. Tiddles

For Mr. Tiddles

ENTRY #25:  Ties that Fish and Bind            by Margaret Starr

Many years ago, a good friend of mine lost her husband.  She wanted to give me his ties, knowing that I used ties to make vests, pillows and wall hangings.  I asked her if she wanted me to make something for her and she requested a pillow.  She loved it!

This started a tradition for me.  Anyone I knew who lost a male relative would give me their ties and I would make something for them.  I ended up with a lot of ties, so I decided to make a quilt with ties as the only fabric.  Dark blue ties form the background water with ripples and waves.  Colorful ties were used for the machine appliquéd fish.

I chose fish as homage to my father, who taught me how to fish.  One summer when I was an adult I got to go fishing every Wednesday with my father and his brother (my uncle).  We got up before dawn and drove into Canada to spend the day fishing and talking. I cherish those memories.

The fabric backing the quilt was given to me by a dear friend. It is silk tie fabric.  Nothing in this quilt is new, except for some new sewing techniques.  I recalled and spoke to many of my friends who have my tie present.  What a lovely mental journey we had reminiscing.

Machine pieced, machine quilted, machine appliquéd, and machine embroidered by participant.

Ties That Fish and Bind

Ties That Fish and Bind

ENTRY #26:  A Tote Bag Story           by Jane Hill

This quilt is a record of my professional life from being a teacher to creating a business called Hillcraft Needle Arts.  Teaching and traveling to quilt shops and shows became a big part of my life in order for my business to succeed.  This quilt is made using a collection of tote bags from places where I taught.  The blocks are arranged in chronological order and have been embellished with pins from shows, guild, or organizations that are part of my story.

My 20 year career allowed me to teach quilting classes nationally and host fashion shows at Houston’s Quilt Market and Festival; to teach on Kaye Wood’s quilting cruises for 10 years and appear on her PBS television shows; and to travel to Europe to lecture.  The Recycling Challenge allowed me to use the stash of tote bags that have been cluttering my sewing room for years to create my memory quilt.  The canvas bags were used to create the top, and the larger shopping bags embellish the back.

Machine pieced, and machine quilted by participant.

A Tote Bag Story

A Tote Bag Story

Entry #27:  Sarah Belle Loved Monograms       by  Karen Berman

Sarabelle, the story behind the quilt.  My friend Mary has shared stories about her mother, Sarabelle, for close to 20 years.  She had a love for monogramming absolutely everything in her home and life, including cigarette boxes, lighter, matchbooks, linens, clothing, bar glasses, jewelry and literally anything that could be monogrammed.  Mary gave me some of her mother’s bed linens and doilies.  I repurposed them into the challenge quilt to remember the “Belle” by.  I used a bed sheet for the center medallion and lace, and her lace doilies for the blocks.

Machine pieced and quilted by participant.

Sarah Belle Loved Monograms

Sarah Belle Loved Monograms

ENTRY #28:  Autumn Trees           by Trudy Flynn

I have had a bag of curtain samples forever and they work very well in the Babylock Embellisher since they are light in weight.  The trees are from fabric I love and thread painting them to the background reminded me of autumn in New York and Vermont.

Machine pieced, quilted, and appliquéd by participant. Background done with Babylock Embellisher (punching machine).

Autumn Trees

Autumn Trees

ENTRY #29:  Memories from My Grandmother           by Bert Hodge

This quilt represents my Grandmother Ames.  She was a knitter and embroiderer and made a sweater for my newborn son, and I had received some tablecloths and doilies from her.  These items were lost in our move to Florida when our van was stolen.  I found these antique items to represent her loving presence in my life.

Hand Quilted and Hand Appliquéd by participant. Used embroidered table cloth that was rescued, also antique doilies.

Memories From My Grandmother

Memories From My Grandmother

ENTRY #30:  My 50 Year Journey with the Angels of Caring       by  Barbara Lamb

The gray stripe and white squares are from my nursing school uniforms. The pinstripe was the dress and the white is from the bibs and aprons worn over the dress.  The four-patch blocks are from scrubs worn as a nurse practitioner.  The backing is from white scrub tops or lab coats, and the print is from a lab jacket.

Machine pieced, machine quilted, and hand appliquéd by participant.

My 50 Year Journey with the Angels of Caring

My 50 Year Journey with the Angels of Caring

Make it Work Challenge - Part 2

This post will have entries 11-20.

ENTRY #11:  Untitled     by Frieda Toback                 

The moon is made of my late husband’s ties.  The tie-dyed orange fabric is/was a sun dress.  Chenille created with scraps of fabric.

The entire challenge had me challenge myself to learn a variety of skills, including ruler work, chenille with scraps, and applying binding by machine.  It’s not perfect, but it’s a start.

Machine pieced, machine quilted, and machine appliquéd by participant.

Untitled

Untitled

ENTRY #13: “Tie One On” – Homage to Countess Mara     by Natalie Abderhalden

This entry won Third Place.

A bag of silk ties languished in my sewing room for years waiting for a proper showcase.  The designs are so artful.  The aqua/green tie is reversed to show how the designs are printed through the silk.  Note the “CU” is backwards.  The sashing and border are from a Ralph Lauren wool suit pants.  Some of these vintage ties are still on eBay!

Machine pieced, machine quilted, and machine appliquéd by participant.

Tie One On

Tie One On

ENTRY #14:  Remembering Harriette       by Marge Lehrer

The dinner napkins were my mother-in-law’s.  She prided herself with her beautifully set tables:  dishes, linens, silver, and flowers.

Machine pieced and quilted by participant.

Remembering Harriette

Remembering Harriette

ENTRY #15:  A Garden Wedding          by Maureen Drudi

This quilt won an Honorable Mention.

This quilt was made entirely from once scrap bag of fabrics left over from making four heirloom wedding quilts for my niece & my three nephews’ brides.

I have the distinct honor of being the only aunt in the family to have made each bride cry at her wedding shower after opening this gift of a wedding quilt that contained wedding dress pieces & other fabrics belonging to all the women in the family. Happy Tears!

In the scrap bag were leftover squares & strips of quilting cottons in white/beiges & colors chosen to match each bride’s wedding colors as well as various odd size pieces of satin, tulles, lining fabrics & appliqués left over from family wedding dresses belonging to the bride & groom’s aunts, mothers & grandmothers. There were also pieces of linens & laces from two great grandmothers. Some of these scraps were so tiny they had to be sewn together to make some of the 2 ½” squares in the background.  The backing is a “never will be used by me” pink linen tablecloth & the batting is scrap pieces saved from other quilts.

As I look at this quilt, I see the few leftover purple blocks & beige squares from Mary’s quilt & the blue bow tie blocks & the satin leaves & tulle wrapped around rattail vines from Janessa’s quilt. The leftover plum & gray 3D diamond blocks & the white folded flanges are from Lyndsay’s quilt; the pink, purple & blue watercolor squares & the sparkling appliqués are from Jen’s quilt. I see the leftover little scrap pieces from all the women in our family, including one tiny piece from my own wedding dress. This is a remembrance quilt for me!

Machine pieced, quilted, & appliquéd by participant.

A Garden Wedding

A Garden Wedding

ENTRY #16:  Japanese Linings         by Diane Paquin Provost

This entry won First Place.

When living in Japan, I collected many vintage kimonos and haoris.  Some of these have beautiful silk linings.  While taking these garments apart, I kept the fabrics as well as the linings.  I made bags, quilts and other projects from the kimono and haori fabrics, but this is my first time using some of the linings.  I had been wanting to use the silk linings in a project for a long time, so when this challenge was announced, there was no hesitation as to what I wanted to do for “Make it Work.”  The fabrics on the top come from 9 different garments and are all silk linings.  The design developed as I was fussy cutting and playing with the prints and the shapes.

Machine pieced and quilted by participant. 

Japanese Linings

Japanese Linings

ENTRY #17:  All That You Can’t Leave Behind       by Johanna Felberbaum

This Entry won an Honorable Mention

This year is one of major changes in my life: graduations; being an empty nester; and a divorce.  My personal mantra is, “Keep moving forward.”  I was inspired to do an arrow motif to show forward movement.

Upon looking for materials in my home, I was faced with a personal history of fibers that told the story of my life thus far.  The arrows are made from my own clothes from the past; shirts, jeans and school uniforms from my boys; upholstery pieces from previous homes; and shirts and silk pocket squares from my ex.

Old designer labels are sown in the past, as they are no longer important.  The clothes, the fabric – it’s just stuff.  “The only baggage I can take is all that I can’t leave behind.” (Walk On, U2) There is space in front of the arrows – an unknown – so that I keep moving forward.

Machine quilted, machine appliquéd, and hand embroidered by participant. 

All That You Cab’t Leave Behind

All That You Cab’t Leave Behind

ENTRY #18:  My Sister Sarah         by Barbara Barron

On a European trip in 1972, my husband and I purchased a fine luncheon tablecloth and napkins in Belgium. We were intrigued by the beautiful lace work that had been traditionally created by talented needle workers.  It has remained, unused, in my linen closet for 46 years.  The linen set was so fragile and lacy that I was intimidated by washing it and was afraid it would never look the same.

The brilliantly colored embroidered appliqué design that forms the border of my wall hanging was carefully cut from a beautiful jacket that my sister Sarah loved to wear.  It has hung in my closet for eight and a half years.  Sarah passed away in 2011 and I decided to honor her memory by creating a memorial art quilt for her.

Machine pieced, quilted, and appliquéd by participant.


My Sister Sarah

My Sister Sarah

Entry #19:  Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue by Terry McCoy

This quilt was made to honor the three women who have helped to shape who I am.  The first is my grandmother, who was my best friend.  It was she who fostered reading, fine cooking, and my love of Biology.  Her handkerchief is incorporated into the Bulletin Board of the quilt along with her picture.  

My mother also was a big part of my destiny.  Her whole life was devoted to be the best mother, daughter, wife, sister and friend.  By her example, I have also learned to be the best mother, daughter, wife, sister and friend that I can be.  We both loved flowers and birds.  Her wedding picture is also on the quilt.\

My sister Nancy was also a phenomenal role model for me.  She was fearless and tenacious.  She had health issues right from birth, but no one would know it by her lifestyle of fierce tenacity.  She handled whatever life gave her the same way.  Her heroism in the face of impending organ transplant and cancer was outstanding.  The wedding gown in the quilt, as well as the ring bearer’s pillow and flower girl basket, was made from the robe she used in the hospital.  She is also maid of honor in the last wedding picture.

Machine quilted and machine appliquéd by participant.

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue

ENTRY #20:  Recycling Memories, Recovering Indelible Moments & Beautifully Moving on with my Journey    by Marianne Haycook

Original Design created in EQ5 (Electric Quilt) using silk blouses and dresses from the 70’s and 80’s in an elongated Log Cabin block design.  Silk clothing worn during my business career working internationally and nationally, as well as my mother’s and a close friend’s black silk disco dress!

Machine pieced by participant; quilted by a longarmer.

1076 pieces in the quilt.

Recycling Memories, Recovering Indelible Moments & Beautifully Moving on with my Journey

Recycling Memories, Recovering Indelible Moments & Beautifully Moving on with my Journey

Make It Work Challenge - Part 1

Here are all the first ten entries for the “Make It Work” Challenge. See this page for details of the challenge.

And the Winner is:

See the quilt under Entry # 16

Diane Paquin Provost

Diane Paquin Provost

ENTRY #1:      Where is My Soul Mate?     by Sue Wiggins                       

While visiting my daughter’s family, typically we catch up while folding laundry.  She has a separate basket with a lot of single socks missing their mates. This was my inspiration.

Machine pieced and quilted and hand appliquéd by participant. Noted by participant: the yellow circles are soap bubbles.

Where is My Soul Mate?

Where is My Soul Mate?

ENTRY #2:  Grandma’s Cross Stitching      by Phyllis Goffe

In the 70s my mother made many cross-stitch tablecloths.  They were well used for many years by me and my family.  This will be a great remembrance for me and for her grandchildren.

Machine pieced and quilted by participant.

Grandma’s Cross Stitching

Grandma’s Cross Stitching

ENTRY # 3:  2nd Place: Rad Paisley Peacock     by Judy Shelton 

I have so many pieces, scraps, and articles of clothing that had been my mother’s as well as my own stuff I couldn’t bear to part with that it was difficult to decide what to use for this challenge. However, in my closet I have a v-neck sweater of my mom’s that has a peacock with its head peeking into the neckline. This always made me laugh. Then I remembered a much loved and cherished skirt of mine with bright colored paisley designs, and the idea of a peacock quilt was born.

It wasn’t emotionally easy for me, but I managed to cut up the skirt’s paisley motifs to use as the peacock’s tail. The body is from a silk blouse of mine, and the peacock’s crown was made using a motif cut from my mom’s beloved sundress.  That was also hard to cut up. The wings and facial features were made using fabric from my stash.

My apologies to singer Brad Paisley for the play on words in the title. I just thought the bright colors in this piece were pretty “rad,” or radical, and there is, after all, lots of paisley! 

Machine appliquéd and machine quilted by participant.

Rad Paisley Peacock

Rad Paisley Peacock

ENTRY #4:  Mini Memories    by Dot Gruber

As I was working on this mini quilt, I found that all the pieces I used were from quilts I had made.  Two especially brought back fond memories.  When the book, Quiltmaker’s Gift, came out, I loved the book and the blocks that were featured in the book.  Making these blocks looked like a fun project, and Benartex fabrics came out with a whole line complementing the blocks and story.  Using this fabric, I made all the blocks in the book and put them in a quilt.

At this time, I belonged to the NJ State quilting Guild and they were starting a program to visit 4th and 5th grades in schools to explain quilting and its connection to shapes and design. I donated this quilt to their project.  That Fall I found out that this quilt was shown at the quilt show in Houston.  Our GCQG member, Jane Hill, saw it there and remembered it because she is the one who quilted it!

The other quilt I still had scraps from was an African quilt design I made after my husband and I returned from a wonderful trip to Africa in 1998.  I made this quilt on our winter visit to Florida in 1999 and I still have it.

Machine pieced and quilted by participant.

Mini Memories

Mini Memories

ENTRY #5:  Going, Going, Gone…..Crazy      by  Lee Hasse

This entry won Viewer’s Choice.

The first thing I thought of for this challenge was the many crocheted and tatted lace doilies that I have saved for many years because I couldn’t bear to throw them away.  The tatting was done by my maternal great grandmother and the crocheted lace by my maternal grandmother.  It took a while to convince myself to cut them up but, when I realized I was never going to use them, these laces became the inspiration for my crazy quilt sampler.  

Working on this challenge gave me a new appreciation of the time and labor that ladies spent creating this type of quilt.  On the back of each block is an example of several of the original doilies.

Machine pieced; embroidered and embellished by participant who also notes, under Hand Quilted:  “Crazy quilts are not quilted in the traditional way, but some research I did indicated that one method was to make small tacking stitches here and there over the block with them hidden under the embroidery.”

Going, Going, Gone …. Crazy

Going, Going, Gone …. Crazy

ENTRY #6Mementoes     by Toby Gluckstern

I have a love-hate relationship with challenges.  First, I groan.  Then, I am energized by the spark of an idea.  The next step is the process, which is never a straightforward, well-thought-out, start-to-finish plan for me. More like fits and starts and undoing.  But ultimately, before the deadline, something unique emerges.  Good or bad, it is an expression of my particular talents, interests, and experiences.

This year I undertook a major downsizing in my living arrangements.  So many items of cherished but outdated, not-worn-for-years clothing were on the verge of being eliminated.  Then, along came the challenge, and I was able to keep a compact version of my memories.  Thanks for the opportunity. 

Machine pieced, quilted, and hand appliquéd by participant.  Embroidery and silk ribbon embroidery done as well.

Mementoes

Mementoes


ENTRY #7:  Bride Meets Godzilla    by Ellen Anderman

It seems that never throwing anything away has its advantages.  I started with a painted canvas from a class many years ago just waiting to be completed.  Then there was the year my husband the bride in a mock wedding and I made him a wedding gown from lace curtains donated by a friend.  And there are always baggies from the morning paper, plastic bags from fancy shops, fruit net bags and mailing envelopes stashed away.  A little tulle and some fancy stitches on the machine and voila! Nothing bought; everything collected. FUN!

Machine pieced, and machine quilted by participant.

Bride Meets Godzilla

Bride Meets Godzilla

ENTRY #8:  Flying Colors      by Jo Wilson

So many classes….  I painted I dyed, I printed, I stamped, I transformed plain fabric.  All the fabric in this piece was created during or after classes.  The hand appliquéd painted owl was trapuntoed so it would seem as if it was in flight.

Machine pieced, machine quilted, and hand appliquéd by participant.

Flying Colors

Flying Colors

ENTRY #9:  Old Sheets     by Ann P Ford

I was gifted a box of old linens from my neighbor, Ausma Merrill, prior to her going to an assisted living facility.  I decided to use the sheets and made quilts for each of my daughters.  It was a “thank you” to the woman who introduced me to quilting and she is the inspiration behind my challenge quilt!

Hand Quilted by participant.

Old Sheets

Old Sheets

ENTRY #10:  In Loving Memory of Gramma Bessie    by Nita Goldman

I took the ribbon-embroidered bed topper that my Gramma Bessie made in about 1919 for her trousseau.  I found some old- fashioned looking floral tone-on-tone fabric for the back, used a wool batting, and a beige fabric as the top.  I basted all three layers together and then machine appliquéd Gramma’s quilt topper to this quilt.  After I sewed around each flower petal, leaf, and ribbon, I echo-quilted the entire quilt.  I trimmed the topper down (it was double bed size) and finished the quilt with a wavy border.

My mother kept the topper for many years, displaying it on her bed when she had company.  She gave it to me about 4 years before her death and I kept it in my closet.  With this Challenge, I finally knew how to honor my grandmother’s memory – and my mother’s as well.

It will hang on my wall as you enter my home.

Machine quilted and machine appliquéd by participant.  “Topper is ribbon-embroidered (on a netting) by my grandmother.”

In Loving Memory of Gramma Bessie

In Loving Memory of Gramma Bessie

2016 Challenge - MASKarade

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